Bridges not walls: a great response to Trump

Today a great many people have been unable to turn their eyes away from Washington, mourning the undemocratic result of the American election and fearing what a President Trump will bring.

Those are understandable reactions, and we need to acknowledge and respect those feelings. Before the election I was saying that I couldn’t imagine a President Trump in charge of nuclear weapons. Now I don’t have to imagine.

But the answer to this election outcome is not to get depressed, but to get even more determined, and that’s what the people of Sheffield, like many around the Britain and the world have been doing today, with about 500 people gathering at the two events I attended in the city centre on this cold winter’s evening.

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What we’re seeing today, I would argue, is the peak, and the end, of the era that began with the rise of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, the era in which the interests of the banks and the multinational companies has dominated over those of communities and entire countries, the time during which we’ve hugely intensified the rate at which we’re trashing the planet, while producing miserable, unhealthy societies.

Many in the US voted for Trump because he held out the promise of something different – but as the former bosses of the vampire squid Goldman Sachs and the climate-destroyer Exxon Mobil have taken some of the most senior posts in the Trump administration, the truth is already becoming clear to some who voted for Trump, that he’s just an extreme, vulgarised form of more of the same.

The US vote was a vote for change – and the voters will quickly realise that that’s not what they’ve got – and the desire, the hunger, for change will still be there.

While it is of course worth noting that he didn’t even in the election – in terms of getting the most votes. The corrupt, undemocratic electoral college system clearly has to go. That a problem for the American people, while we can focus on our own corrupt, undemocratic politics, and demand democracy also in the UK,, where we have a government with 100% of the power based on the votes of 24% of eligible voters, and a manifesto now entirely irrelevant.

More, today Green MP Caroline Lucas was presenting before parliament her Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE) bill, which would make providing an education for life, including sex and relationship education, required in all government-funded schools. It was widely backed by civil society groups, including the Fawcett Society, the Terence Higgins Trust and St John’s Ambulance. But it didn’t get debated, being filibustered by a group of the usual Tory suspects, who make no pretence at respect for democracy.

As we work on creating a democratic system for the UK, we need to make sure that the misogyny, the racism, the vile level of public discourse is not normalised, which means standing up against it and calling it out – as the lovingly handcrafted signs saying “pussies against Trump” (yes, some lovely cat pictures) in Sheffield did tonight.

It means saying “refugees welcome”, “multinational companies must pay their taxes”, “decent benefits for everyone who needs them”, “climate change is real” and much more.

It means presenting a message of hopeful, positive change, to counter the fear and division of Trump, Farage and their ilk.

For as Green Cllr Magid Magid said tonight, “hope always trumps fear”.